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HOW CAN THE FIRE SERVICE BEST EDUCATE THE PUBLIC ON SAFETY

What can we do as Firefighters to bring to the public the awareness and knowledge of devices and procedures to follow to keep them safe in the time of emergency. 

Should we start and or support programs in schools, business's and the work place again as we are just as valuable as teachers of fire prevention as we are as responders?

What is our responsibility to our fellow citizens and how best can we as representatives of the Fire service help everyone to understand their need to be prepared? 


 

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I think to have a more aggressive education in the school system on fire safety, at a very early age, progressing to more advanced education in the perils of fire to the point of showing slide shows of the dangers.
Adults will watch but not listen, so it is the younger person to be informed about fire saftey at an age they will not forget.
I agree that this should be re-instituted in the school systems as before. When I was young every year the local insurance agency would send a representative to the grammar schools and pass out a news letter geared to the grade levels and plastic fire helmets for all the children to wear and take home.

I wish to work with an agency that will help me make these presentations again. The children all loved the hats and the news letters and looked forward to the return of the representative every year.

It would be great to have it planned so the local fire departments could be present also to let the children see and interact with a fire truck too.

Try to see what you can make happen like this in your area Captain.

Thank you for your input here.

Respectfully,

Fireman Fritz
Yes you are right , the fire departments here do go to the schools some with Sparky to educate the children on what to do in case they catch fire IE: drop roll and cover also stay low when exiting a building etc .
On fire prevention week the departments have them go through a simulated smoke house with their parents to have them understand the importance to have a fire plan of escape.
I would like to see this be done on a more regular basis, have the schools to make this an hour each month and even have some exam on it at the end of the year.
I know it is at a very young age this must be taught.
Thank you for your reply I hope others join in this discussion becuase this is how we learn from one another and eventually come to a good program.
Cpt Dennis
first, departments musT distinguish the difference between public information, public education and public relations. once this is done, programs can be set up to support each of these 3 parts of the PIO"s responsibility. public information is reporting on incidents, providing written safety info., reporting departmental progress and happenings. public education is actual teaching and educating children, adults and seniors (kids with no rules) speaking of seniors, we must not forget them while instittuting fire safety programs. they should be an important target group as they face many new challenges. young children are also a target group as they are eager to learn and education provided will stay witht htem. we should do this by forming a partership with the teachers and school system and have the teachers recognize that we are educators, not just a firefighter on a big rig that shows up in october to let the kids climb all over the rig. that is public relations. giving plastic hats, stickers, etc. is relations not education. so many departments think that showing up with an engine or truck and handing out materials is education. its not . that action is public relations or public information. TEACHING fire safety, providing and supporting programs to schools and seniors, interacting with target groups is public education.

Mark Smith

FF2
Mark,
Thank you for your insight and direction on this topic as it is very important to know about and then pass along good ideas and advice> Your posting has been both of these and more. Respectfully,
Fireman Fritz

mark smith said:
first, departments musT distinguish the difference between public information, public education and public relations. once this is done, programs can be set up to support each of these 3 parts of the PIO"s responsibility. public information is reporting on incidents, providing written safety info., reporting departmental progress and happenings. public education is actual teaching and educating children, adults and seniors (kids with no rules) speaking of seniors, we must not forget them while instittuting fire safety programs. they should be an important target group as they face many new challenges. young children are also a target group as they are eager to learn and education provided will stay witht htem. we should do this by forming a partership with the teachers and school system and have the teachers recognize that we are educators, not just a firefighter on a big rig that shows up in october to let the kids climb all over the rig. that is public relations. giving plastic hats, stickers, etc. is relations not education. so many departments think that showing up with an engine or truck and handing out materials is education. its not . that action is public relations or public information. TEACHING fire safety, providing and supporting programs to schools and seniors, interacting with target groups is public education.

Mark Smith

FF2


Lieutenant Frederick Georges said:
Mark,
Thank you for your insight and direction on this topic as it is very important to know about and then pass along good ideas and advice> Your posting has been both of these and more. Respectfully,
Fireman Fritz

mark smith said:
first, departments musT distinguish the difference between public information, public education and public relations. once this is done, programs can be set up to support each of these 3 parts of the PIO"s responsibility. public information is reporting on incidents, providing written safety info., reporting departmental progress and happenings. public education is actual teaching and educating children, adults and seniors (kids with no rules) speaking of seniors, we must not forget them while instittuting fire safety programs. they should be an important target group as they face many new challenges. young children are also a target group as they are eager to learn and education provided will stay witht htem. we should do this by forming a partership with the teachers and school system and have the teachers recognize that we are educators, not just a firefighter on a big rig that shows up in october to let the kids climb all over the rig. that is public relations. giving plastic hats, stickers, etc. is relations not education. so many departments think that showing up with an engine or truck and handing out materials is education. its not . that action is public relations or public information. TEACHING fire safety, providing and supporting programs to schools and seniors, interacting with target groups is public education.

Mark Smith

FF2

Hello everyone,

   I think we need to change things up when we visit schools and adult groups. Sure it's all vital information that we pass on but it's very dry and repetative. If the adults don't listen - that means the task of informing them has to be created for thier involvement, get the ideas rolling off of thier tongues instead of the one teaching the program. As for the kids, they don't need much except things that are colourful and at thier level. Teaching little ones the IFSTA manual would just fly above them. Then if you get in front of an adult or even teen group, stay at the level that the majority of the people are at. If some can't read well, don't ask for people to read out loud, just ask them what they think the picture is telling them what to do or what they think they would do for that situation.

   I have taught many different things to the public (all ages), and they're a tough crowd if you're not prepared.

The little ones only have an attention span of 10 - 15 min max - so change up the program a little. Have them sit, listen to the story or lesson, get them up, do something physical and then go over what they just learned by colouring a picture or doing puzzles. 20 min done.

The teens, should be challenged at least a little. If it's too easy, you'll definately loose them.

I challenge my teen groups with a game/competition.

Fire rules, chemicals, hazards, signs and even some first aid. They get a lesson, have fun and you'll have thier soul attention, because they're busy. For the ones that don't know or don't participate, encourage them to listen and join in if they have an answer. Right or wrong - at least they tried, keep encouraging them.

The adult groups, it's a bit more of a challenge for the instructor, because unless you go and ask for hands of the ones who can't read or only learn by doing or only learn by listening, then this will have to be figured out by observing on how the class reacts to the practical lessons and or questions asked.

   Now to top it all off, the different languages that the instructors need to plug through, if it's a lesson for immigrants. now that's interesting!!!  Lots of pictures! However, I've learned that if only white figures are used in the pictures, some people may not get the idea of what's supposed to be done - for some reason.

I've had to switch up most of my pictures to all colours of people with different clothing, so they can grasp the concept of the lesson and that it's safe for all, not just white people.

You may think this is weird, Yes, I think so too, however, it works!

   It's not just going to schools or adult groups that is important. It's to get the messages out into the public for the ones who don't attend school or groups, Like maybe through newspapers articles / ads, maybe ask a local TV station or radio station if they would run FREE advertising - to keep everyone safe, once a week.

   They could talk about or print different fire/safety info every week and your dept runs a fundraiser / collection for a charity of thier choice or something like that, once or twice a year. Nice trade!

My FD uses all the resources we can, to pass the information out to anyone who wants to know.

 

Stay Safe!

Katharine Blohm

mark smith said:



Lieutenant Frederick Georges said:
Mark,
Thank you for your insight and direction on this topic as it is very important to know about and then pass along good ideas and advice> Your posting has been both of these and more. Respectfully,
Fireman Fritz

mark smith said:
first, departments musT distinguish the difference between public information, public education and public relations. once this is done, programs can be set up to support each of these 3 parts of the PIO"s responsibility. public information is reporting on incidents, providing written safety info., reporting departmental progress and happenings. public education is actual teaching and educating children, adults and seniors (kids with no rules) speaking of seniors, we must not forget them while instittuting fire safety programs. they should be an important target group as they face many new challenges. young children are also a target group as they are eager to learn and education provided will stay witht htem. we should do this by forming a partership with the teachers and school system and have the teachers recognize that we are educators, not just a firefighter on a big rig that shows up in october to let the kids climb all over the rig. that is public relations. giving plastic hats, stickers, etc. is relations not education. so many departments think that showing up with an engine or truck and handing out materials is education. its not . that action is public relations or public information. TEACHING fire safety, providing and supporting programs to schools and seniors, interacting with target groups is public education.

Mark Smith

FF2

Well, it has been a while since we last talked about this topic and I was wondering how everyone was doing with their efforts to "spread the word"

I have focused on presentations that are a mix of fire history, fire safety and protocols that encourage citizens to learn to have special emergency packs set away from the main house to be accessed that have "must have" items and supplies in them.

I need only set up the sessions with the local schools and event center group presentations.

 

Katharine Blohm said:

Hello everyone,

   I think we need to change things up when we visit schools and adult groups. Sure it's all vital information that we pass on but it's very dry and repetative. If the adults don't listen - that means the task of informing them has to be created for thier involvement, get the ideas rolling off of thier tongues instead of the one teaching the program. As for the kids, they don't need much except things that are colourful and at thier level. Teaching little ones the IFSTA manual would just fly above them. Then if you get in front of an adult or even teen group, stay at the level that the majority of the people are at. If some can't read well, don't ask for people to read out loud, just ask them what they think the picture is telling them what to do or what they think they would do for that situation.

   I have taught many different things to the public (all ages), and they're a tough crowd if you're not prepared.

The little ones only have an attention span of 10 - 15 min max - so change up the program a little. Have them sit, listen to the story or lesson, get them up, do something physical and then go over what they just learned by colouring a picture or doing puzzles. 20 min done.

The teens, should be challenged at least a little. If it's too easy, you'll definately loose them.

I challenge my teen groups with a game/competition.

Fire rules, chemicals, hazards, signs and even some first aid. They get a lesson, have fun and you'll have thier soul attention, because they're busy. For the ones that don't know or don't participate, encourage them to listen and join in if they have an answer. Right or wrong - at least they tried, keep encouraging them.

The adult groups, it's a bit more of a challenge for the instructor, because unless you go and ask for hands of the ones who can't read or only learn by doing or only learn by listening, then this will have to be figured out by observing on how the class reacts to the practical lessons and or questions asked.

   Now to top it all off, the different languages that the instructors need to plug through, if it's a lesson for immigrants. now that's interesting!!!  Lots of pictures! However, I've learned that if only white figures are used in the pictures, some people may not get the idea of what's supposed to be done - for some reason.

I've had to switch up most of my pictures to all colours of people with different clothing, so they can grasp the concept of the lesson and that it's safe for all, not just white people.

You may think this is weird, Yes, I think so too, however, it works!

   It's not just going to schools or adult groups that is important. It's to get the messages out into the public for the ones who don't attend school or groups, Like maybe through newspapers articles / ads, maybe ask a local TV station or radio station if they would run FREE advertising - to keep everyone safe, once a week.

   They could talk about or print different fire/safety info every week and your dept runs a fundraiser / collection for a charity of thier choice or something like that, once or twice a year. Nice trade!

My FD uses all the resources we can, to pass the information out to anyone who wants to know.

 

Stay Safe!

Katharine Blohm

mark smith said:



Lieutenant Frederick Georges said:
Mark,
Thank you for your insight and direction on this topic as it is very important to know about and then pass along good ideas and advice> Your posting has been both of these and more. Respectfully,
Fireman Fritz

mark smith said:
first, departments musT distinguish the difference between public information, public education and public relations. once this is done, programs can be set up to support each of these 3 parts of the PIO"s responsibility. public information is reporting on incidents, providing written safety info., reporting departmental progress and happenings. public education is actual teaching and educating children, adults and seniors (kids with no rules) speaking of seniors, we must not forget them while instittuting fire safety programs. they should be an important target group as they face many new challenges. young children are also a target group as they are eager to learn and education provided will stay witht htem. we should do this by forming a partership with the teachers and school system and have the teachers recognize that we are educators, not just a firefighter on a big rig that shows up in october to let the kids climb all over the rig. that is public relations. giving plastic hats, stickers, etc. is relations not education. so many departments think that showing up with an engine or truck and handing out materials is education. its not . that action is public relations or public information. TEACHING fire safety, providing and supporting programs to schools and seniors, interacting with target groups is public education.

Mark Smith

FF2

Has anyone else created a startup program or joined an organization to get the word out? If yes, share what you have done so others can have a model to go by. Or if it is acceptable help you.

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