FirefighterCountry

Firefighters open chat room for serious learning and sharing without fear

This topic was brought to my attention by one of our members who had the responsibility to lead a crew as Captain for many years.

I respect and appreciate the input of senior department officers who are kind enough to help me to learn and grow so I may become a better professional that is an asset to any department I am honored to contribute to. This is why I have posted this discussion

When first I saw this video I was concerned about the copious amount of smoke and no visible flames anywhere. I felt perhaps they had already knocked down the fire so the smoke and steam were all that was left and they were deploying personnel to the roof to open a vent.

It was shocking to see what happened next.

                             TO HELP THIS FIREMAN CLICK HERE :     FUNDRAISER

Views: 56

Replies to This Discussion

Just what you would expect from a structure which was that involved. It seemed from my limited observations of structure fires, that there was a lot of smoke coming from everywhere. I was told that meant there was much fire that could not get the air it needed to flame up, so it would be very dangerous to open anything quickly because of the possibility of flash over.

 
Then to listen to everyone yelling "lets get in there and get him out"! This obviously means others will be subjected to extreme risk too in order to rescue him.
 
 

I feel they always go up to the roof to determine a site to cut a ventilation port. I feel that it must first be determined if the structure will hold together before this is attempted, but again it seems the people doing this are not communicating with the rest of the crew, so they find themselves in serious trouble.

 
We are fortunate to have served when we did, back when you had to think every move through because there were not as many PPE  advantages and  new age equipment to give us the same false security these folks have today.

 

UPDATE ON INJURED FIREFIGHTER

I had the privilege to correspond with this California Firefighter about this incident. He offered to me the comment under his photo below.

Curt Cozad
Works at Sacramento Metropolitan Fire District
Attended San Joaquin Delta College
Lives in Elk Grove, CA, United States
==============================================

 
Because that's our job as a truck company. The fire had not vented yet, so the inside crews were still in extreme heat conditions and the fire was waiting for an oxygen source. The huge flash was the fire getting the last part of the fire triangle "Oxygen." The Truck Captain was sounding the roof in preparation for a ventilation process. The last place he sounded looked solid, but the spot where he fell through was compromised. One of those dangerous procedures that we do as part of our job.
==============================================
 
I understand that your charge is to vent the structure.

What I did not know was that crews were inside still dealing with the high heat scenario. My comment clearly indicates this.

I felt the fire had been knocked down already, a low heat scenario. That is why I was surprised to see the flames and wondered why the truck company operators were roof bound. Even if they found a safe area to open up the vent, it would have flashed over and hurt someone.

We were taught to vent at ground level to offer the oxygen and then deal with the consequences.

That is very dangerous too, but you will not be blown off or fall through the roof.

To just declare that it is "one of those dangerous procedures that we do as part of our job", is unacceptable.

That Captain is seriously hurt now and it was preventable. 

Now I am wondering how the other crews made out after the structure exploded into flames like it did.

I realize that I do not know or understand everything. So to compensate, I asked questions and try to learn as much as possible from any credible source. I also have the disadvantage of being old, so learned many techniques that are outdated now.

Having admitted these facts I have to report that I have never had anyone hurt or injured when we vented a structure,... first from the ground to oxidize the fire, then if possible after cooling it all down with suppressant, vent the roof or upper wall to evacuate the smoke,... on any department I served on. 



Lieutenant Frederick Georges said:

I had the privilege to correspond with this California Firefighter about this incident. He offered to me the comment under his photo below.

Curt Cozad
Works at Sacramento Metropolitan Fire District
Attended San Joaquin Delta College
Lives in Elk Grove, CA, United States
==============================================

 
Because that's our job as a truck company. The fire had not vented yet, so the inside crews were still in extreme heat conditions and the fire was waiting for an oxygen source. The huge flash was the fire getting the last part of the fire triangle "Oxygen." The Truck Captain was sounding the roof in preparation for a ventilation process. The last place he sounded looked solid, but the spot where he fell through was compromised. One of those dangerous procedures that we do as part of our job.
==============================================

RSS

HIGH RISE FIREFIGHTING

 

LINKS

YOUR AD HERE

Badge

Loading…

YOUR AD HERE

FIREFIGHTER UNIFORMS

GLOBE FIRE SUITES

***CUSTOM HELMETS***

FIREFIGHTER BOOTS

EDUCATION PROGRAM

CLICK ON THE LINK TO HELP PREPARE OUR NEXT GENERATION TO BE TOMORROW'S FIREFIGHTER-EMT's                               N.S.V.F.F.   

© 2019   Created by Lieutenant Frederick Georges.   Powered by

Badges  |  Report an Issue  |  Terms of Service