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I know what you are thinking! And that is exactly what I wanted to get your faces on this posting.

The following was posted on FireRescue1 and I was certain all would be willing here on FirefighterCountry to try to pass along this most valuable and needed information to who ever you feel will make good use of it.

You can click on the above picture link or just copy and paste it right from this blog page below. 

Thank you all for your support.

Fireman Fritz

FIREMAN FRITZ

How to prepare for violent incidents

Use these 9 questions and 14 steps to prepare your fire department for incidents that turn violent

Nine questions

  1. Do you use risk/benefit analysis for every call?
  2. Do you have an effective relationship at all levels with the law enforcement agencies in your community?
  3. How good is the information you get from your dispatcher?
  4. Do you allow members to first respond directly to the scene?
  5. Does your law enforcement agency use an incident management system?
  6. When responding to a potentially violent incident, do you seek out a law enforcement officer when you arrive?
  7. Have you told your fire officers/personnel that it is OK to leave the scene if things start to turn bad?
  8. Is there a point where you don't respond or limit your response to violent incidents?
  9. Is your uniform easily mistaken for law enforcement?

==================================================

14 Recommendations

  1. To standardize identification, the federal definition of a violent incident should be adopted.
  2. The National Fire Incident Reporting System should be modified to include appropriate data fields to facilitate statistical data collection and analysis of violent incidents.
  3. Response agencies must adhere to a unified command structure that reinforces the use of an integrated incident management system. Multiple or separate command posts should be discouraged.
  4. No resource should be permitted to self-dispatch or self-deploy to any incident. All requests for assistance should emanate from the command post following established protocols.
  5. Radio and communication discipline should be stressed so that conflicting information can be evaluated before action is taken. Concurrently, on-scene personnel movements must be tracked through an accountability system to prevent emergency responders from becoming victims of friendly fire.
  6. Dispatch should provide all emergency responders with historical data for specific locations or individuals so that the responders can develop and implement defensive tactics in anticipation of a potential violent incident. Where legal obstacles prevent the dissemination of such information, efforts should be undertaken to enact laws or regulations to permit this information to be shared with emergency responders.
  7. All emergency response agencies should adopt protocols and policies dealing with response to violent incidents. Examples of such protocols and policies are provided in the appendices of this report. These policies should be as inclusive and encompassing as possible while recognizing the resource limitations of each particular agency. Protocols should also include policies on the dissemination of information to family members, the media and the general public.
  8. Training programs should be developed that include recognition of the potential for violent incidents; situational awareness and appropriate actions to take during violent incidents; and self-defense strategies and tactics to employ if confronted by a violent incident. Agencies should participate in multi-discipline training exercises that can simulate an event and create opportunities to refine and improve the strategy and tactics to be used during a violent incident.
  9. The potential for violent incidents should be considered when constructing new facilities. Where appropriate, construction-hardening features including access-limiting designs should be incorporated.
  10. Prior to and during times of heightened or sensitive events, fire departments should conduct planning sessions with law enforcement and other response elements to discuss how operations will proceed before, during and after the event. During such planning, member protection and situational awareness should be emphasized.
  11. Fire service organizations should proactively provide information and intelligence to fusion centers for evaluation and analysis on an ongoing basis.
  12. Fire departments and law enforcement agencies should work together to develop procedures or guidelines for response to active shooters, including incidents at schools and mass-gathering facilities.
  13. After-action review should be standard operating procedure in all fire departments.
  14. National, state and local stakeholders should be used to mobilize efforts that create awareness and advance this initiative. These same networks can be used to ensure that the training, policies and protocols created to address this initiative are distributed in a sensitive manner.

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